Social media has reinvented the way we view activism. No longer do you need to pass out flyers or go knock on several doors to spread the word. A simple tweet to your followers or a post on Instagram will reach more people, in a short amount of time. This is especially true for individuals that are internet sensations or have a massive following. Social media presence is king in today’s society.

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So far 2018 has been an amazing year for Black cinema. No two portrayals are the same and there is a little something for everyone. While there is still progress to be made these films are refreshing to see. Long before its release, I had been hearing talks of a film adaption of Angie Thomas’ debut novel “The Hate U Give.” The bidding war for the rights was being discussed, reactions to the cast, and even talks of colorism all shrouded the film before it even hit theaters. One of the running themes or emotions I felt while watching this film was the honesty of it all. As a Black woman watching this film I felt seen and I knew so many others would too.

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Coheed and Cambria is a four man band that consists of guitarist/vocalists Claudio Sanchez and Travis Stever, drummer Josh Eppard, and Zach Cooper on the bass. Sanchez is the lead singer and also one of the primary songwriters. The group is renowned for their concept pieces because they’re each tied into one ongoing story, The Amory Wars. The 16-year long conceptual project is a science fiction comic book series, and the brainchild of Sanchez who doubles as an illustrator and writer of the comics.

The creator of the Emmy nominated web series “Brown Girls,” Fatimah Asghar, has released “If They Come For Us,”  a book of poetry that “captures the experiences of being a young Pakistani Muslim woman in contemporary America.” Through her work of both “Brown Girls,” and “If They Come For Us,” Asghar talks about the intersectionality of being a woman, an orphan, an immigrant, Muslim in America, and queer.

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