On a cold and windy Saturday night last month, a long line of people huddled in coats stood outside of ABV Gallery in Atlanta. The line  wrapped around the side of the building. The gallery, located off of Auburn Avenue, was debuting its eponymous winter exhibition- ‘A Better View.’ Crowds swarmed in to admire and discuss the paintings of more than 50 artists from cities and countries around the world, from Portland, Oregon and Venice, California to Portugal and Australia.

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There is an unfathomable power emitted by art that uses urban landscapes as its canvas. It is not exclusive to those of a certain social class or within art circles; it is accessible to all. It does not rely on an unchanging gallery space to be seen or understood; it adapts to the fluidity and movement of its dynamic surroundings.

Blending African-American women and traditional Korean dress seems like an idea that one has to ponder for a while, but not for one artist. According to koreadailyus.com, Chris Shim was inspired by a random thought that these two elements would go together. This simple thought couldn’t have been more true; the two cultures fuse perfectly showcasing the ideal representation of multiculturalism. Shim mixes the cultures effortlessly in his murals shown around the world, from Korea to California.

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A painting is often defined, not by the artist or the quality, but by the content. Some paintings were intended to capture a thought, and some were intended to capture images. But sometimes, the best paintings capture moments unplanned and unscripted. They capture life.

Eric Lacombe personifies death.

A childhood interest in decay and death created a lengthy career in art for the French graphic designer turned self-taught painter. His talent for drawing began at a young age before eventually losing interest, then taking up his old hobby after becoming a graphic designer. To the online community, Eric Lacombe is also known as “Monstror,” meaning evil omen or monster in Latin. This artist represents intersectionality of death and silence through his infamous paintings of animal/human hybrids. Acrylic on canvas, ink on paper and oil pens are his weapons of choice. He focuses on the manifestation of the obliteration and the briefness of mortality through these various mediums. Lacombe’s pieces are unconventionally ethereal. His paintings and sculptures focus on tortured entities while still maintaining light, airy characteristics. Lacombe’s fascination with the juxtaposition of calamity and chaos with beautiful creations and peacefulness manifests itself in breathtaking portraits of desolation.

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If you look at a painting, you might be able to tell what the artist is feeling, but  you wouldn’t be able to tell me if the artist is deaf,  autistic, or if they are a paraplegic. If you were to accept that dare, your odds of success would be grim.  Of all the difficulties those living with disabilities face in life, some things simply can’t be hindered by a disability, and one of those things is art.

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